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Making Evidence-Based Claims Unit Grade 10: MLK, Barak Obama

Odell Education

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Note that this resource was reviewed during the Spring 2014 review period. The resource may or may not have been updated since the review. Check with the content creator to see if there is a more recent version available.

Review

This resource was reviewed by OSPI in Spring 2014. Learn more about the review process and the data analysis approach.

Background from OER Project Review Team
Odell Education is an organization of educational specialists focusing their efforts on the implementation of the Common Core State Standards. This unit is part of the Developing Core Proficiencies Curriculum funded by the USNY (New York) Regents Research Fund.

EQuIP (Learn more)

Exemplar (11.3)
Chart with scale of 'meets criteria' from 0 (None) to 3 (All). Alignment: 3.0, Key Shifts in the CCSS: 2.75, Instructional Supports: 2.5, Assessment: 3.0.

Achieve OER (Learn more)

Chart with scale from 0 (Weak) to 3 (Superior). Explanation: 2.75, Interactivity: 0.0, Exercises: 2.25, Deeper Learning: 2.75.

See standard error chart for the review scoring

Reviewer Comments (Learn more)

Minor (1.3)

Comments/Ideal Use:

This unit is listed as a 9-10th grade unit and is appropriate for that level. It could also be used in in higher level 7th and 8th grade classes and in 11th and 12th. It could be used in either a language arts or social studies class and, while designed for the traditional classroom, could be adapted to a flipped or blended model. It is not technology dependent.

Strengths:

  • The unit scaffolds lessons and activities to build students' skill in writing evidence based claims.
  • Strong unit clearly CCSS aligned.
  • Clear graphic organizers, rubrics, instructions
  • Texts will be available online

Challenges:

  • Support for ELL and those reading below grade level is given but additional strategies would be helpful. The procedures include recommendations such as "ELL students or those reading below grade level can be supported by having their claims evaluated before they begin writing their pieces." Additional strategies such as referring to videos of the speeches would be helpful.
  • Could more closely integrate speaking and listening and multimedia

Suggestions:

  • Inclusion of additional ELL strategies

Comments/Ideal Use:

This unit could be used in any classroom context and any teacher could use this material. Students with special needs may need some special assistance and extra support to develop the claims. This unit would be an introduction to argumentative essays and making claims, and a teacher could move into actually writing an argumentative essay.

It does a nice job of close reading and providing discussion questions, although not necessarily the processes for these class discussions that would be the most productive. A teacher might need additional protocols for the discussions and how to best assess them.

Strengths:

  • Helps students understand what a claim is and how to find it in text and then develop their own. It would be great as part of a larger writing unit.
  • Good rubrics and checklists for teachers and students to formatively and summatively assess their work.
  • Texts are accessible but rigorous.

Challenges:

  • Adaptions for ELL and SPED students not addressed specifically

Suggestions:

  • Direct instruction of some vocabulary may assist. The scaffolding of the lessons is useful but may not be enough.

Comments/Ideal Use:

This unit seems very limited in its focus (good thing). With the sequence of activities, content material and learning tools it provides, it does a really good job troubleshooting or giving guidance for the instructor to help them conceptualize what their teaching approach will be for a UBD fit.

This resource does not require an immense amount of imagination or additional work to implement. The beauty of this resource is that it can be used as a supplement or it can be modified in various ways to be made more accessible or applied towards other CCSS in ELA if desired. It would serve as a cross-discipline/ cross functional tool in several content areas; Social Studies (US History, CWP), ELA 9-10 and Debate. Any level of instructor ought to be able to utilize this resource.

Strengths:

  • This resource is exemplar because of the detail in assisting the instructional facilitator to 'conceptualize' the process of applying the various methodologies, tools, skill sets to the content provided for learning. Narrative that runs throughout the object makes it simple to follow along and imagine a functioning classroom environment filled with a diverse student population.
  • Instructional Notes’ are a nice touch for the novice teacher or teacher working with a diverse populations of students with differing degrees of background and ability coming into the text.
  • Assessment features and tools utilized to engage the text.
  • The text features include numbered paragraphs, bolded vocabulary words for attention and emphasis to vocabulary development, built in EBC organizers with partial examples to help with development and use of tools.

Challenges:

  • Types of learning activities are minimal in accessibility.

Suggestions:

  • Provide links to VIDEO that is available. Utilize closed captioning w/ audio, etc. Create optional templates to scaffold learning of skill sets. CCSS.

Comments/Ideal Use:

The lesson successfully integrates speaking, listening, reading and writing in the instructional strategies and provides opportunities to assess students in each of these areas.

These lessons could be used with any 9th or 10th grade English class. Although the resource does not provide enough explicit information about how to provide support for lower readers or ELL students, a more experienced teacher could easily make the needed adjustments, both in instruction and in the process of the lesson.

Strengths:

  • The checklists are extremely helpful both for instruction and assessment.
  • Students are provided an opportunity to read the texts without a lot of previous teaching (front loading) and have an opportunity to build perseverance in reading difficult texts.
  • Students engage in close reading. Text based questions provided. The lessons focus on small sections of the text at a time and allow students opportunities to read the text, talk about their reading and develop evidence-based claims.
  • The graphic organizers require students to provide evidence from the text in several ways and then students have to use the evidence to develop support for their essays.
  • Speaking and listening well integrated to support and encourage students as they build their skills in developing and writing about evidence-based claims and engage in text centered discussions. The instructional notes include explicit instructions for students to work in pairs as well as to discuss as a full group. A checklist supports teachers in evaluation speaking and listening and the instruction suggests that the checklist be used in instruction so students understand what text centered discussion looks like and sounds like.

Challenges:

  • Not enough specific supports provided for lower readers or language learners. There are some ideas in the instructional notes about if students should be given tasks as homework no specific alternative or extra scaffolding for students who need more support. This is true in all aspects of the assignment from reading to answering the questions all the way to writing about an evidence based claim of their own.
  • There are no scored samples of student work. Less experienced teachers might feel insecure in evaluating student work.

Suggestions:

  • Provide some extra scaffolding ideas. For example, to lead up to the writing piece the teacher could provide some frames for how to integrate quotes or paraphrase the text. Some students would not need the frames so they would only be given to the learners who would benefit from their use.
  • Add some scored examples of student writing.

Creative Commons License
This work by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.